News Burst 25 May 2022 - Get The News!

News Burst 25 May 2022

News Burst 25 May 2022 – Get The News! By Disclosure News.

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News Burst 25 May 2022 – Featured News

  • Indonesia’s President Joko Widodo visited Washington last weekend along with other South-East Asian leaders, as his US counterpart Joe Biden seeks to court the region against growing Chinese influence. But it was a trip to the small town of Boca Chica, Texas, that attracted more attention back home in Indonesia. Mr Widodo had lined up a high-profile meeting with Tesla and Space X founder Elon Musk at the private space agency’s headquarters, where he was given a private tour. As Mr Widodo praised the tech baron as a “super genius”, Mr Musk declared he was “very interested” in the future of Indonesia, a country of 270 million people. The world’s richest man also said the country exuded “positive energy”.

 

  • One of the world’s largest museums, the State Hermitage in St.Petersburg, will not be participating in foreign exhibitions this year because of the Ukraine conflict, its director, Mikhail Piotrovsky, said on Tuesday. “Under the current circumstances, we will not have permission to export [the art pieces] outside the Russian Federation,” he told journalists, adding that the museum will continue to host exhibitions in Russian cities. He also noted that the Hermitage doesn’t usually lend out its pieces to foreign exhibits, but rather conducts them itself. “Various centers and Hermitage satellites existed for this. We do exhibitions with our colleagues, this is a fundamentally important thing,” he explained. “We create new meanings.”

 

  • As US Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman General Mark Milley met on Monday with allies to drum up new weapons shipments to Kiev, they sat in front of four upside down Ukrainian flags. The snafu wasn’t the first time that top-level politicians in Washington have gotten confused on the country they’re bankrolling. Behind Austin and Milley, four Ukrainian flags had been hung upside down, with yellow on top instead of blue.

 

  • Amid never-ending spy games, the capacity to make someone tell the full truth during an interrogation, or to wipe out a subject’s personality and impose another – perhaps, a controlled one – became quite attractive to secret services. In 1979, former US State Department officer John Marks published a book called “The Search for the ‘Manchurian Candidate’,” which focused on the CIA’s mind-control experiments and is based on agency documents released under the Freedom of Information Act. The term ‘Manchurian Candidate’ emerged from a title of a novel by Richard Condon, first published in 1959, which tells the story of a US soldier brainwashed and turned into an assassin by the Communists. Back then, the fear that America’s rivals might use such techniques was not only a fictional fantasy, but a matter of very serious concern.

 

  • Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban announced a state of emergency in a video address on his Facebook page. The emergency regime takes effect at midnight, and the first measures will be revealed on Wednesday. “To safeguard Hungary’s national security interests, to make sure we stay out of the war and to protect Hungarian families, the government needs room to maneuver and the ability to act immediately,” Orban said in the announcement.

 

  • The ancient pterosaur—a flying reptile—existed 86 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous period, an era which is often referred to as the last segment of the “Age of Dinosaurs.” The giant predator, which was about as large as a school bus, lived in what is now known as the Andes mountains in Argentina’s western Mendoza province. Scientists in Argentina have discovered fossils belonging to an unknown dinosaur in the Andes mountains, at which point the supercontinent Pangea had already begun to split apart into the continents we recognize today. The rocks containing the ancient creature’s bones date back to the Cretaceous period. The Thanatosdrakon amaru, dubbed “the Dragon of Death,” was a pterosaur about 30 feet long (a Pterodactyl is 6 feet long), with a wingspan of 23 feet. Thanatosdrakon amaru predated birds as one of the first predators to hunt from the sky.

 

  • The US plans to invest billions on Arctic defense including modernizing its Thule Air Base in Greenland, Danish newspaper Berlingske reported on Monday, citing an American military report. Neither Denmark nor Greenland have been informed of the plans, it claimed. According to the outlet, the Washington has given the green light to “significant investments” into its northernmost outpost amid, what it called, “increasingly aggressive” behavior from Russia. Citing a statement from the US Air Force, Berlingske wrote that the money would go to upgrading aging infrastructure at Thule. The plans, Berlingske claimed, came as a surprise to the Danish parliament and the Greenlandic government, as the US is supposed to “consult and inform” both regarding any significant changes to its military operations in Greenland, an autonomous territory of Denmark.

 

  • Britain could soon be hit by a bottled beer shortage as glassware production costs soar, according to leading Scottish wholesaler Dunns Food and Drinks. Suppliers are already starting to struggle with a glassware shortage after prices skyrocketed by 80% over the past year due to rising energy costs. According to Dunn, some brewers may be forced to switch to different containers for their products, which could further push prices up for consumers. “Specialist bottles and glassware hold a very important place in the heritage of the beer industry and I expect that while some breweries will convert to cans to ensure consistent supply, others will look at this as devaluing the brand, so will inevitably pass the additional cost on to beer drinkers,” she said.

 

  • The White House quickly downplayed the president’s purported gaffe about US resolve to protect Taiwan against Beijing. Nevertheless, Biden’s remarks have created widespread confusion and heightened tensions in the Indo-Pacific. “Pathetically, delivering a statement by the leadership but immediately revised by certain anonymous White House officials is neither ‘strategic clarity’ nor ‘strategic ambiguity’ but ‘strategic confusion’,” says Dr Chang Ching, a research fellow from the Taiwan-based Society for Strategic Studies and a lead military expert on the People’s Liberation Army and regional security in Taiwan.

 

  • The Turkish government has issued an official list of five demands that it wants Sweden to fulfil in exchange for its backing of the country’s NATO application. Speaking on Tuesday, Ankara said that it wants “concrete assurances” from Stockholm that it will sever all relations with groups linked to the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), considered a terrorist group by Turkey, the EU and the US.

 

  • French jobseekers’ website TrouveTonJob.co has landed in hot water after rolling out a bunch of ads that were deemed by users to be racist, sexist and fatphobic. It was the activist group Pepite Sexiste that drew attention to a bizarre marketing campaign that the French website chose to promote its services. Among the “humorous” ads that the website rolled out was a call to use porn to learn English and a picture of a skinny guy carrying a plus-size woman on his shoulders, captioned “When you haven’t properly prepared your interview”. Another joke was a picture of a black man’s foot standing on a calendar on the month of March, with the caption reading “The first African man to set foot on Mars. The pride of a whole continent.” It apparently referred to how “March” and “Mars” are both pronounced “Mars” in French.

 

  • Russian scientists have developed an algorithm that improves photon detection efficiency in quantum key distribution (QKD) systems. Quantum key distribution is a super-secure method of encrypting information designed to eliminate the possibility of leakage or hacking by digital means. When a key – the “instruction” for encrypting and decrypting information – is transmitted, quantum uncertainty is activated, making interception of the key by existing hacking tools theoretically impossible.

 

  • Planets in binary systems built around sun-like stars could be great targets in the search for alien life, which could finally bring mankind the result it longs for, a new study published in the journal Nature suggests. According to University of Copenhagen researchers, over half of the stars the size of the sun are in binary systems, where the energy stretches the habitable region further out and makes it larger. The findings determined that these stars warm each other’s worlds, increasing the chances of being orbited by a planet with liquid water. “The result is exciting since the search for extra-terrestrial life will be equipped with several new, extremely powerful instruments within the coming years,” Professor Jes Kristian Jorgensen, one of the study’s main authors, is quoted in the Daily Mail report as saying.

 

  • The WHO recently announced plans for an international pandemic treaty tied to a digital passport and digital ID system. Meeting in December 2021 in a special session for only the second time since the WHO’s founding in 1948, the Health Assembly of the WHO adopted a single decision titled, “The World Together.” The WHO plans to finalize the treaty by 2024. It will aim to shift governing authority now reserved to sovereign states to the WHO during a pandemic by legally binding member states to the WHO’s revised International Health Regulations. In addition to the authority to make the determination of a public health emergency of international concern under Article 12, the WHO will be granted additional powers to determine a public health emergency of regional concern, as well as a category referred to as an intermediate health alert.

 

  • NASA’s Voyager 1 mission launched in 1977, passed into what scientists call interstellar space in 2012 and just kept going — the spacecraft is now 14.5 billion miles (23.3 billion kilometers) away from Earth. And while Voyager 1 is still operating properly, scientists on the mission recently noticed that it appeared confused about its location in space without going into safe mode or otherwise sounding an alarm. “A mystery like this is sort of par for the course at this stage of the Voyager mission,” Suzanne Dodd, project manager for Voyager 1 and its twin, Voyager 2, at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California, said in a statement. “The spacecraft are both almost 45 years old, which is far beyond what the mission planners anticipated,” Dodd added. “We’re also in interstellar space — a high-radiation environment that no spacecraft have flown in before.”
News Burst 25 May 2022

News Burst 25 May 2022 – Bonus IMG

News Burst 25 May 2022 - Mansa Musa

​Mansa Musa the Emperor of Mali

Mansa Musa, the richest man in the world, was a mighty emperor of the Malian Empire who reigned during the 14th century. Mansa Musa was extremely wealthy, even by today’s standards. It is estimated that he had a personal fortune of around $400 billion, which would make him the richest man in history. That’s more than twice as much as Bill Gates, and Jeff Bezos are worth today. He was estimated to have owned half of all the world’s gold located in the Bambuk Mines at his death.

News Burst 25 May 2022 – Bonus IMG

News Burst 25 May 2022 - WEF

​Mansa Musa the Emperor of Mali

Mansa Musa, the richest man in the world, was a mighty emperor of the Malian Empire who reigned during the 14th century. Mansa Musa was extremely wealthy, even by today’s standards. It is estimated that he had a personal fortune of around $400 billion, which would make him the richest man in history. That’s more than twice as much as Bill Gates, and Jeff Bezos are worth today. He was estimated to have owned half of all the world’s gold located in the Bambuk Mines at his death.

News Burst 25 May 2022 – Bonus Video

Bronx, New York – 10 May 2022

News Burst 25 May 2022 – Earthquakes

Earthquakes Last 36 Hours – M4 and Above

News Burst 29 June 2022 – Get The News!

News Burst 29 June 2022 – Get The News!

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News Burst 28 June 2022 – Get The News!

News Burst 28 June 2022 – Get The News!

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News Burst 27 June 2022 – Get The News!

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News Burst 26 June 2022 – Get The News!

News Burst 26 June 2022 – Get The News!

News Burst 26 June 2022News Burst 26 June 2022 - Get The News! By Disclosure News.Clicks on the Ads Keep Us Alive 😊 News Burst 26 June 2022 - Featured News The Vatican's secret archives are one of the most heavily guarded sites in the world: their protection...

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News Burst 24 June 2022 – Get The News!

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News Burst 23 June 2022 – Get The News!

News Burst 23 June 2022 News Burst 23 June 2022 - Get The News! By Disclosure News. Clicks on the Ads Keep Us Alive 😊 News Burst 23 June 2022 - Featured News An eagle-eyed team of a curator and a librarian tracked down a pair of portraits by Ammi Phillips that...

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