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News Burst 19 May 2024 - Get The News!

News Burst 19 May 2024

  • Finnish authorities have auctioned off a hundred bicycles used by asylum seekers to cross the border with Russia. Authorities said that most migrants attempting to enter the Nordic country hailed from Africa and the Middle East. Helsinki shut down all crossings in December 2023 due to the volume of asylum requests. The auction, featuring one hundred bicycles, was held by Finnish customs officials in the border village of Vaalimaa on Thursday. The first bike went for €70 ($76), though buyers were required to pay a 24% value added tax on top on the price. Other examples attracted higher bids, with one person telling reporters that the €120 he shelled out was “quite a reasonable price” given the bike’s good condition. The highest bid recorded at the auction was about €160.

 

  • Ruby Franke made headlines in February as the popular YouTuber, with over 2.3 million followers, was sentenced to four prison sentences spanning between one and 15 years each for aggravated child abuse. The 42-year-old mother of six from Utah in the US pleaded guilty to starving and abusing her children while profiting from sharing parenting advice on social media. Despite Franke’s case being an extreme example, it shed new light on the issues around digital child labor and children’s privacy in the age of social media—and legislators are beginning to regulate. Millions of parents giving up their children’s privacy. Whether they’re sharing updates of their lives, or trying to carve out a slice of an industry set to reach $24 billion by the end of 2024, more and more children are having their faces uploaded for the world to see. Alongside Instagram, YouTuber vloggers, and TikTok fashion influencers, there’s a whole industry filled with viral happy families, first-time moms, dads, and solo kids making millions in marketing campaigns and brand partnerships. After going unregulated for so long, those blurred digital lines are coming down, as legislators worldwide jump into action. Italy is the latest country currently considering a law to safeguard children’s images online and prevent parents from exploiting their kids for profits.

 

  • Slovak Prime Minister Robert Fico survived an assassination attempt against him earlier this week after being shot several times at point-blank range by a man who was angry about him suspending armed aid to Ukraine. Fico’s return to office last fall came in spite of American meddling that sought to scare folks away from voting for this conservative-nationalist firebrand, after which he promptly recalibrated his country’s policy towards Ukraine and formed a peace coalition with Hungary. While some are suspicious that the “lone wolf” who shot him might not have been acting on his own due to Fico making very powerful enemies across the world during his latest term, this incident at the very least proves that fake news can radicalize people into committing heinous crimes. After all, the shooter convinced himself that this was a legitimate form of protest against what he thought was his country’s “pro-Russian fascist dictator”, the perception of which was entirely shaped by fake news.

 

  • The Pentagon is ‘proud’… and so is the Biden administration. But the US taxpayer? “Today we began delivery of aid from the temporary pier on to the beach of Gaza for further distribution to the people by our partners,” US Central Command announced Friday. “This unique logistics capability facilitates the delivery of lifesaving humanitarian aid enabling a shared service for the international community to use to serve the people of Gaza.” It’s “unique” we’re told… and only costs about $350 million. But critics have pointed out the grim irony and contradictions which abound in that the Biden administration has very publicly criticized the way that Israel’s military is waging war in Gaza (and especially the high civilian death toll) while simultaneously Washington is funding it, ultimately to the tune of billions. ~ Tyler Durden

 

  • The Namib Desert in southwestern Africa is one of the most inhospitable places on the planet. It rarely rains, unless you count the fog that often blankets the coastal area. There are no lakes or ponds. There’s almost no surface water at all, save for ephemeral streams that emerge when scattered storms bring rain in the winter. Even those streams flow for just a few days or weeks each year, and they disappear into the ground or evaporate into the air long before they reach the sea. The Namib Desert is one of the most sparsely-populated parts of Namibia. But despite the harsh environment, there is still something that draws people deep into the desert: uranium. Namibia is among the top five uranium-exporting countries in the world. The Erongo region is home to Rössing mine, the oldest and third-largest producer of uranium in the world. Situated about 70 kilometers (40 miles) northeast of the coastal city of Swakopmund, the mine is located near the ephemeral Khan River. Water samples from the Khan River channel showed elevated uranium levels.

 

  • Chinese authorities have unveiled their most significant steps yet to address the crisis that has been dragging on the country’s property sector in recent years. The new measures include cutting the amount home buyers need for a deposit and encouraging local authorities to purchase unsold properties. The announcements came on the same day as official figures showed the steepest drop in home prices in almost a decade, in a sign the crisis is deepening. Problems in China’s property market are having a major impact on the world’s second largest economy as the industry had been a key driver of growth until recently. The country’s central bank effectively scrapped the minimum mortgage rate and cut the minimum down payment for first-home buyers from 20% to 15%. The minimum deposit for second homes was lowered to 25% from 30%. In January, Evergrande – which is the world’s most indebted property developer – was ordered to be liquidated by a court in Hong Kong.

 

  • British supermarket giant, Sainsbury’s could be the latest retailer to harness AI to gain better insights into customer shopping behaviours and find new ways to streamline services. The supermarket has revealed that it has entered a five-year partnership with Microsoft although the exact details and value of the deal have not been revealed. Sainsbury’s is expected to utilise its data and consumer behaviour insights, whilst Microsoft will bring technological expertise which could help the retailer come up with a game plan for how best to implement and leverage AI for its business.

 

  • A reptile lover has issued a warning to both locals and tourists after discovering a massive crocodile hidden under the ground. Andre Rocha was visiting Tabasco State in Mexico when he spotted the crocodile emerging from a hole below his feet — a little-known tactic used by crocs. Documenting the moment, Rocha took several images of his feet standing on the ground above the predator in a burrow below. “I came across this while crocodiling in Tabasco and I wanted to share it with you,” he said before issuing an important warning about crocs in the region. “When you are visiting areas where crocodiles are known to live, don’t only pay attention to the water,” he said. “They can dig and create tunnels that connect to where they live both in and out of the water and are almost invisible to the eye.

 

  • Ancient trees harbouring animals on the verge of extinction inside an Australian national park have been cut down by government contractors, in a move a leading conservation scientist has described as “complete madness”. While Victorian authorities maintain its works are essential to lessen the threat of bushfires and protect native wildlife, there is mounting concern about its methods. At least one endangered greater glider is dead, while others are presumed homeless and likely will not survive. The hollows these fluffy, koala-like, nocturnal marsupials use to sleep in are in short supply. The Forest Fire Management Victoria (FFMV), which operates within the Department, had spray painted pink markings on centuries-old eucalypts at the edges of tracks. This indicated the trees had been assessed by its workers as posing a hazard and thus needed to be cut down.

 

  • Some Canadian provinces have logged a jump in unclaimed dead bodies in recent years, with next of kin citing funeral costs as a growing reason for not collecting loved ones’ remains. The phenomenon has prompted at least one province to build a new storage facility. Demand for memorial fundraisers has surged. The overall cost of a funeral in Canada at the top end has increased to about $8,800 from about $6,000 in 1998, according to industry trade group estimates. In Ontario, Canada’s most populous province, the number of unclaimed dead bodies rose to 1,183 in 2023 from 242 in 2013, said Dirk Huyer, the province’s chief coroner.

 

  • Tourists stranded in New Caledonia are rationing food as they wait for a way out of the troubled Pacific island territory, after riots that killed four people, a traveller from Sydney said on Saturday. “The kids are definitely hungry because we don’t really have much option of what we can feed them,” Joanne Elias said from a resort in the capital Noumea, where her family has been holed up since the unrest broke out this week. “You can tell they are running out of food,” she told Reuters by phone, referring to the resort where they are staying. After three nights of upheaval, hundreds of French police reinforcements began arriving in the French-ruled territory on Friday in an effort to regain control of the capital. The riots, sparked by anger among indigenous Kanak people over a contested electoral reform, have resulted in burnt businesses, torched cars, looted shops and road barricades, cutting off access to medicine and food, authorities say. The New Caledonia government said on Friday the island had stocks of food for two months and the problem was distribution.

 

  • On Friday, the European Council announced it was suspending the broadcasting activities of four additional media organizations, claiming that they “spread and support” Russian propaganda. The blacklist includes RIA Novosti news agency, newspapers Izvestia and Rossiyskaya Gazeta, and the Czech-based portal Voice of Europe. Writing on Telegram on Saturday, Vyacheslav Volodin described the move as showing the EU’s desire “to close access to objective and reliable information” for residents of member states. According to the lawmaker, “the policy of double standards has become an integral part of European structures” as they only “talk about freedom of speech, but do not tolerate it in reality”.

 

  • The US has announced a ban on cotton imports from 26 Chinese companies that source it from Xinjiang, citing allegations of forced labor and genocide of the mainly Muslim Uighur minority there. Washington has long accused Beijing of persecuting the Uighurs, which China has denied as complete lies and fabrications. “The Department of Homeland Security will not tolerate forced labor in our nation’s supply chains,” DHS Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas said on Thursday, announcing the addition of 26 Chinese companies to the sanctioned blacklist under the Uighur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA).

 

  • The Orion Nebula may be a familiar and well-studied celestial object, but new images from the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) show this star-forming cloud of gas and dust in an incredibly new and vibrant light. The Orion Nebula, also known as “Messier 42” (M42), is located around 1,500 light years from Earth toward the constellation of Orion. This makes it the closest large star-forming and stellar nursery to our solar system. Visible to the naked eye under dark skies, the Orion Nebula has been studied throughout human history, but the JWST images show it in unprecedented detail. In particular, the powerful space telescope zoomed in on the diagonal, ridge-like feature of gas and dust at the lower left quadrant of M42 called “the Orion Bar.”

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News Burst 19 May 2024

Astronomical Events in 2024

Astronomical Events in 2024

Welcome to 2024! There are plenty of events stargazers can add to their calendars.

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News Burst 19 May 2024 – Bonus Image

News Burst 19 May 2024 - Cave Paintings

Cave Paintings

Separated by more than 14,000 kilometers (about 8,700 miles), these two cave paintings share remarkably similar characteristics, each featuring 13 vectors converging towards a central point. One is located in Caxingó, Piauí, Brazil, while the other is in Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India. #drthehistories

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News Burst 19 May 2024 – Bonus Video

Quartz

Rare Enhydro Quartz contains over a hundred moving bubbles, each in a tiny cavity filled with ancient water. Formed in a hydrothermal solution, water in some specimens have been preserved within crystals for millions of years. 📹 @rocksforthe

News Burst 19 May 2024 – Bonus Video

“Frameless” Art Museum In London

News Burst 19 May 2024 – Earthquake Video

Earthquakes Above M4 In The Last 36 Hours

News Burst 15 June 2024 – Get The News!

News Burst 15 June 2024 – Get The News!

News Burst 15 June 2024 ​In the era of hybrid work, with employees splitting their time between two days in the office and three days working remotely, employers have ramped up using productivity monitoring software. However, employees have outsmarted some of these...

News Burst 14 June 2024 – Get The News!

News Burst 14 June 2024 – Get The News!

News Burst 14 June 2024 Saudi Arabia will not renew its 50-year petrodollar agreement with the United States, which expired on Sunday, June 9, 2024. This will allow the Saudis to sell oil in any currency, and not just in US dollars, as was previously the case.  ...

News Burst 13 June 2024 – Get The News!

News Burst 13 June 2024 – Get The News!

News Burst 13 June 2024 Johnson & Johnson opens new tab has agreed to pay $700 million to settle an investigation by 42 U.S. states and Washington, D.C. into its marketing of baby powder and other talc-based products blamed for allegedly causing cancer. The...

News Burst 12 June 2024 – Get The News!

News Burst 12 June 2024 – Get The News!

News Burst 12 June 2024 Tesla and SpaceX tycoon Elon Musk lashed out Monday at a partnership between OpenAI and Apple, saying the threat to data security will make him ban iPhones at his companies. "Apple has no clue what's actually going on once they hand your data...

News Burst 11 June 2024 – Get The News!

News Burst 11 June 2024 – Get The News!

News Burst 11 June 2024 A military plane carrying Malawi's vice president and nine others has gone missing, sparking a massive search operation. Vice President Saulos Chilima's plane left the capital, Lilongwe, and failed to land at Mzuzu International Airport - about...

News Burst 9 June 2024 – Get The News!

News Burst 9 June 2024 – Get The News!

News Burst 9 June 2024 ​"It's cruel to state this, but the right to have a different opinion has ceased to exist in the European Union." Slovak Prime Minister Robert Fico in his first public remarks since May 15, when he was shot multiple times.   Police in Spain...

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